The Hidden Curriculum

The hidden curriculum should concern parents, teachers and school leaders.  Teaching is a form of communication.  When we communicate there are times when what we see doesn’t exactly jive with the situation or the manner in which we say it.  It can be obvious: shouting, “I’m not angry with you.”  It can also be subtly undermining.

In this post I want to share with you some of my perceptions of the hidden messages that free schools can unwittingly pass on to children.  They are not good messages.  But when we are aware of them, we can try to do something about it!

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The Down Side

  1. An essentialist view of human nature that can reduce adult responsibility to intervene when children show educational or other ‘deficits’; the suggestion that some people are just born smarter than others, for example.
  2. Too much adult time and material resources dedicated to children that are in classrooms or that choose the exam routes of academic subjects. Or the reverse.
  3. The fact that children who can read have more opportunities to exercise their free choice than children who cannot.
  4. The belief that it is okay to remove children from a society of their peers and give them a special education apart, with little concern for socio-political ideas of equality, class-consciousness and oppression.
  5. A closer student-teacher relationship that makes it much easier for the teacher to be an influence on certain children, even if not intended.
  6. The notion that children can generate their own meanings and learning which, however possible in certain areas of life, can be a serious handicap to personal progress at certain stages of formal subject learning.
  7. Any kind of hero-founder myth that creates belief without thinking or analysis, and any kind of fantasy that free schools are utopias.

The Up Side

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Of course, the hidden curriculum of a Free School has many good features. For example, in a free school, the nature of the environment itself:

  1. Encourages children to be self-sufficient, understanding through their own experience the limits of their abilities.
  2. Promotes an atmosphere of open tolerance where problems are resolved in meetings.  There is no recourse to authority figures.
  3. Offers the option of a Reduced Formal Curriculum, with the implicit message that there is a structure of knowledge that can be accessed by children.
  4. Allows unchecked practice in the natural concentration that takes place when children are engaged in something they have freely chosen to do.
  5. Gives children the power to say “no”.
  6. Says that adults are not there to entertain children, or totally responsible for a child’s successes or difficulties. This helps the child own responsibility for herself, and for the general school community.

It is a good idea for schools to look at the assumptions of their hidden curriculum regularly. They can invite outside voices to comment on their structures and processes. 

Free schools must be constantly aware of the hidden messages their school contexts give:

freedom of choice of action in a community is no automatic  protection against a hidden curriculum developing unseen negatives.

MBAT
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Reporting to Families

When I was at school the annual report came on one folio size sheet of paper with a separate box for each subject. I went away to university, took a different path in life and then decided to start teaching. When I came back into the classroom as a teacher, I was astonished by the changes.

Reports came in a thick wadge with a separate page for each subject. It was printed in a font that pretended to be script but it was generated by a computer. Teachers in their teams decided on statements for each of the key learning objectives. Instead of writing a report, we just had to check boxes on a sheet that was read by a machine. This then generated the full text of the report, which was supposed to cover all the attainment targets we had dutifully taken from the National Curriculum Schemes of Work.

When I gave out the reports to my tutor group, the kids looked through their reports and compared notes. One of the boys raised his hand.

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“What is it?” I asked.

“My report is exactly the same as John’s,” he said.

“Really?”

“Yes. We checked.”

Boring Accuracy

It was not that surprising. Most students fall somewhere in the middle of the band in most subjects. Even when they don’t, the language of the paragraphs was so similar that you could barely tell the difference. Who cares whether you are “gaining confidence in” a subject, “confident” in it, or “completely confident” in it. The descriptors were accurate according to the schemes of work, but they were unbearably bland.

It was lousy communication. Instead of giving a simple grade, descriptive text had been invented to make the grade “say something”. The content was just like the phony script font: it was fake. Children could supposedly see with absolute accuracy where they were according to the Attainment Targets and levels of the National Curriculum. I don’t think any of them were taken in by this. None of them felt that their reports had much to say about them.

You can’t have decent communication with anyone unless you establish between both parties what it is you are talking about. There is no shortcut. Dialogue is essential. Curriculum objectives are there to guide teachers in their work. They are neither motivating nor particularly interesting to learners. Children are more motivated and interested in one authentic comment written by a teacher who has thought about them as a person, than a hundred accurate grade descriptors.

If you really want to communicate you have to engage the other person in the conversation.

Dialogue is Essential

Compassionate dialogue is at the heart of our best practice.  This is as true for families as it is for students.  We communicate frankly and openly with families.  From the very start of their relationship with the school they enter a respectful dialogue with the school.  This does not consist of the school giving advice and coaching to parents.  The school doesn’t present its conclusions in a comprehensive booklet! It is a conversation in which the perceptions and actions of both sides are valid and relevant to the progress of children.

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The moment they enroll their children, families receive a welcome message from the child’s tutor, setting up a first meeting.  The teacher responsible for parent engagement also gets in touch. Reporting to families is built on the foundation of a relationship where real communication is key. It is not an end in itself; it is a part of the dialogue.

Information

The school is open with information.  There are many documents outlining school policies and handbooks for parents and students.  Teachers openly share information with parents: there is a regularly updated file in each child’s online folder which includes teacher comments and examples of projects; parents can also add information and images to this file.  We think it is better to keep this real: we love it when parents read to their kids, have deep conversations with them, go for a hike or visit a museum. 

There are many opportunities to talk to the class teacher.  Parents and carers can usually have a short chat after school hours without making an appointment.  They may also volunteer to work in the school and have direct contact with teaching staff.  In addition, there are many social events through the school year at which parents can get to know members of staff: festivities, performances and exhibitions, for example.  We welcome parents who want to bring their own experience and skills into the school and there are mechanisms in place to ensure that this contribution is balanced and appropriate.

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Every term families receive a short report from the school in line with our reporting schedule. We don’t intend this document to be comprehensive or clinically accurate. It gives an indication of National Curriculum levels, but that is not its only purpose. It celebrates things that have been achieved and gives some ideas about things that can be attended to. There is space on the report for students and families to add their own observations. There is a formal parent teacher conference day at which families can book a slot to talk to any teacher who has contact with their child.  This comes right after they get the report.

Our reports are not booklets. They are simple documents that serve a purpose.

Worries?

If parents have significant worries, they can arrange a formal conversation including the Head of Phase and the Principal.  Formal conversations are always minuted and normally take place in the Principal’s office.  Possible reasons for a formal conversation are requests for expert advice over learning problems, exceptional requests for absence or formal complaints.  Complaints always follow the school Complaints Procedure.

Teachers’ record-keeping

How much information is too much? When does record-keeping tip over into surveillance? In this post I want to explain what our approach to record-keeping is, how it fits in with our ideas about freedom, and the implications for teachers.

Panopticon: the All-Seeing Eye

In the image you can see a “panopticon”. This was a style of prison invented by Jeremy Bentham in England. In the centre there is a tower where the guards sit. Around it are the cells, all of which are completely open to inspection from the tower. Bentham thought that this constant openness to supervision would lead to improvements in morality, health and industry. Read more here.

The ideas that motivated the panopticon are easily seen in education. The teacher is at the centre of a web of information, looking into the private world of each child. This supervision will help the child. It is motivated by uplifting ideas of controlled learning, development and growth. And, with modern technology, there is the possibility of an ever-increasing fine texture to the supervision of the children: applications allow teachers to record and communicate information about them at the tap of a screen.

MBAT is a free school. Children have free choice of action. This means there are times when they are involved in their own freely-chosen activities or play. The freedom wouldn’t mean much if teachers were following them around with their mobile phones clicking the equivalent of Class Dojo every time a child hit an official learning objective. We are serious about freedom and we protect it.

Teachers have to understand what freedom of choice of action implies. It may mean changing the presuppositions they have grown up with about teaching and teachers: that the teacher is there to ask the difficult question; that good teachers get inside their students’ heads to find out what makes them tick; that anything that happens is good evidence that can be recorded.

I have seen this happen. When a teacher internalizes the curriculum and learning objectives, she may approach a child with a grid overlaying her vision. She will be like a fighter pilot with an intelligent helmet. Everything the child says or does will be filtered through the presuppositions of the learning model she is using. Needless to say, this strips any communication of authenticity and purpose. Whatever a child says serves the higher purpose of learning, a purpose that is pre-planned, designed and packaged.

Our policy on record-keeping safeguards children from this level of supervision.

Protect them from supervision

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Record-keeping is important. MBAT, however, provides free spaces where both teachers and children are liberated from the burden of surveillance. We help teachers to understand when they can step back and let things happen. We limit our demands for information on both teachers and children. It is important to do this because we live in a world where it is often assumed that the more information the better. We do not agree with this. We think children benefit from times and spaces where they are not being watched, monitored, measured and controlled.

  • we do not assess freely-chosen activities
  • we do not try to “improve” free play
  • behaviour is not recorded

We even go further than that within the communities from Junior upwards. When the students are able to run their own community meetings much of the burden of discipline and control falls completely from the shoulders of teachers. They do not act as police, judge and arbiter. Those functions are assumed by the community itself.

What are the implications? For teachers there is a dramatically reduced burden of record-keeping.

What teachers record

Teachers must keep records of what happens in their classes, in the project area or in activities.  These records must be made available to their team leader on request as they may help with further professional development.  They contain, at the very least:

  • the learning objective
  • what happened
  • whether students met the learning objective.

Class teachers collect comments, photographs and work to add to the online portfolio.  Parents can also add to the online portfolio.  These portfolios are not graded or marked.

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As children move up through the school, teachers use tests and examinations more frequently.  The results of tests are included in the online portfolio, which is open to parents, teachers and children.  We still do not mark or grade projects and activities and some testing is not recorded.  For example, many of the online exercises give a score which we do not record.  This is essential for motivation: children must feel that they can come back and take tests as many times as they need to without the pressure of performance.  Children often ask for tests because they like to know whether they have learnt the subject in hand.  When we employ teachers, we ask about their experience in testing and assessment.  We look for teachers with imaginative and compassionate ideas.

Assessment: the Key to Success

What do you think of assessment? Aside from theories and practice there is a feeling about assessment that motivates us. That feeling comes from deep roots. Since I think in images, I shall explain it this way.

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I have a garden. It is important for me to get some things right in order to get a crop. The soil needs to be right, for example, and plants that need full sun don’t get planted in the shade. Some need more water than others. I have to keep an eye on the plants as they are growing to make sure they are getting what they need, but the growing? Well, plants grow by themselves.

What I don’t do is walk around the garden measuring the plants all the time. When I was a complete novice I was more tempted to do this. It had nothing to do with the plants and a lot to do with my anxiety: I really wanted those plants to come out as perfect specimens. With a little experience I’ve become much more patient: my cauliflowers took ages to mature and I didn’t feel rushed or bothered.

We have called the lower school Hadiqa– the Garden. Plants, growth and Nature are a part of the way we think. We recognize that we, as humans, are a part of Nature and we value that. I suppose you might say that we see learning and growth as part of a natural process that connects us to the world around us. And, like good gardeners, we spend more time thinking about whether the soil is right than with how tall the plants (or children) are.

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Production Line

There is another image of education: the `production line. The school I went to as a kid was an exam factory. It gained more fee-paying parents on the basis of its examination results. This meant that, from the moment you entered the school to the moment you left, your life was a preparation for taking those examinations. If you could take another course that led to another examination, you were strongly pushed to do so. There were tests and examinations all the time.

Measurement was important in this system. Every subject had termly “orders” where children were ranked according to how well they did in examinations. All these statistics were lumped together to give class orders, which supposedly showed who was the “best” in the year. It was depressing for me and I did well in those orders; I can’t imagine what it was like for the ones who didn’t.

There are some advantages to this system. The assessment is linked only to what goes on in the classroom; there are no fuzzy lines. Teachers are only interested in what goes on in the classroom so it is pretty easy to create a bulwark against school work. The subjects are separate, so you can get by with flunking a few. The emphasis on summative assessment even gives you an “out”: “I just had a bad day.”

Assessment for Learning

The school I went to was a bit old-fashioned even in those days. It had a relentless emphasis on formal summative assessment. If you look at a modern curriculum authority, such as Cambridge, you will see a much more humane and considered approach to what assessment is all about. They use the acronym AFL- Assessment for Learning. That makes sense to me. What do you go to school for if not to learn? Why not use every tool at your disposal to make that learning better?

Any activity which checks how well a student is learning is assessing that student’s learning. 

Cambridge University Assessment

Our approach to assessment is guided by humane principles. We follow the English National Curriculum for the Core Curriculum and want children not just to get by, but to excel in it. We are slightly different from other schools in that we offer considerable freedom of choice to the children. Some of their activities are not assessed in any way at all. But when it comes to formal work in the classroom, we see no reason not to use all the best and most recent research and evidence available to make that learning pleasurable and productive.

Assessment at MBAT

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Assessment and record-keeping are necessary tools that help teachers monitor the development of children.  However, at MBAT, classroom assessment is a means to an end and not an end in itself.  It allows teachers and children:

  • To recognize progress and monitor achievement necessary for moving on to the next stage in learning.
  • To recognize problem areas for possible support.

It may also allow teachers to reflect on their own practice.

We separate informal assessments, which all teachers make based on their day-to-day observations, from a variety of more formal assessments, such as:

  • Level tests
  • Diagnostic tests
  • Formal examinations

All children take part in informal assessment as a necessary part of learning.  Formal assessments are only made after explaining to parents and children the purpose of the assessment.

Tests

At times there are tests in classes.  Children may enjoy taking a test and are encouraged to see tests as a part of the learning process.  However, we do not compile a database of scores on these tests.  If teachers have an anxiety about progress in a particular group or individual for a subject in the Core, they might propose a diagnostic test to discover whether this is really the case.  These scores will be recorded because they need to go to SMT, particularly if they imply a resourcing need.

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We do not grade projects or activities.  Younger students may have no test scores whatsoever, since they work extensively in the project curriculum.  We favor what we call “family assessment” for little children.  In a family you know when something is not quite right and you act accordingly, which might mean using a test and might not. 

Our group sizes are so small that it is possible for the teachers and teacher assistants to use the Tracking Mechanism without setting tests or exams.  Teachers may share this information with parents: there is a regularly updated file in each child’s online folder which includes teacher comments and examples of projects; parents can also add information and images to this file. 

Reporting to Parents

Compassionate dialogue is at the heart of our best practice.  This is as true for parents as it is for students.  We communicate frankly and openly with parents. 

From the very start of their relationship with the school parents enter a respectful dialogue with the school.  This does not consist of the school giving advice and coaching to parents.  It is a conversation in which the perceptions and actions of both sides are valid and relevant to the progress of children.

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We are open with information

The moment they enroll their children, they will receive a welcome message from the child’s tutor, setting up a first meeting.  The teacher responsible for parent engagement will also get in touch and they will automatically form a part of the PTO.  We hope that this will be the start of a long partnership. 

The school is open with information.  There are many documents outlining school policies and handbooks for parents and students.  Teachers openly share information with parents: there is a regularly updated file in each child’s online folder which includes teacher comments and examples of projects; parents can also add information and images to this file.  We think it is better to keep this real: we love it when parents read to their kids, have deep conversations with them, go for a hike or visit a museum. 

Talk to the teacher

There are many opportunities to talk to the class teacher.  Parents can usually have a short chat after school hours without making an appointment.  They may also volunteer to work in the school and have direct contact with teaching staff.  In addition, there are many social events through the school year at which parents can get to know members of staff: festivities, performances and exhibitions, for example.  We welcome parents who want to bring their own experience and skills into the school and there are mechanisms in place to ensure that this contribution is balanced and appropriate.

Every term parents receive a short report from the school in line with our reporting schedule and once a year there is a formal parent teacher conference day at which they can book a slot to talk to any teacher who has contact with their child.  They can add their own observations to this report.

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If parents have significant worries, they can arrange a formal conversation including the Head of Phase and the Principal.  Formal conversations are always minuted and normally take place in the Principal’s office.  Possible reasons for a formal conversation are requests for expert advice over learning problems, exceptional requests for absence or formal complaints.  Complaints always follow the school Complaints Procedure (Appendix: Complaints Procedure).

Parents can engage with the school at the upper levels by adopting the core principles of:

non-violence, dialogue, equality and compassion. 

We want to hear what their experiences are so that we can adapt our own practice.  We may produce a collaborative school magazine or yearbook using articles from parents and teachers, for example.

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Professional Development

Happy teachers make happy schools. Quality and relevant professional development is at the heart of good practice. MBAT aspires to provide an exciting and changing environment that will provide challenge and opportunity to all its teachers.

Professional Development

Professional development is continuously monitored.  Requests for training form a part of each termly chat and are reviewed in the post term SMT meeting.

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Training occurs at different levels.  Staff start work one week before the commencement of the school term.  In this week the school will arrange training, which it will negotiate with training providers or offer itself. 

Pre-school training

This training may include:

  • CPR and First Aid Training offered by the Senior Nurse
  • Calendar and administration
  • Cross-phase issues
  • Training in the use of the Online Portfolio system
  • How to run community meetings
  • Health and Safety and Risk Assessment
  • Project-based Learning strategies
  • The Flipped Classroom
  • How to use the Farm
  • How to use the Sea

Teachers and Phase Leaders may offer training during this week. The Principal and Phase Leaders will be attentive to examples of creative good practice within the school and will offer a small bonus for skills-sharing workshops.  Over time we expect to be able to offer training to other schools and education providers.

Distance Learning

All teachers will be expected to get certification with Google Educate.  The distance Learning Coordinator will be responsible for training new staff in the use of Online Portfolios. 

The Principal will lead the creation of the Flipped Classroom environment with the assistance of the Distance Learning Coordinator.  Teachers will learn how to create subject content online using the MBAT model and publish it through the school channels.

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Non-directive classrooms

The school benefits from the assistance of specialist advisors in the set up and running of non-directive classrooms.  These experts will be available to offer training sessions specifically geared to the different phases in the school.  The Principal will supervise the training program ensuring that it covers all ages.  It is the Principal’s responsibility to ensure that there is continuity in the educational provision.

External Training Providers

The SMT may take advantage of vetted training from external training providers.  When Bahr opens specific training needs will become apparent, depending on the examination route the school chooses to take.  If we take the AQA route, for example, teachers may need to take specific training for teaching syllabus materials.

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Performance Evaluation and Appraisal

Staff appraisal takes place under the overarching philosophy of compassion, dialogue and community. 

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All staff work within teams and have team leaders.  This includes the non-academic staff under the management of the Bursar.

When staff are appointed, they sign a contract that is based on a detailed Job Description.  The Job Description lays out the duties, responsibilities and obligations of the post.  It may be modified over time as new areas of responsibility are undertaken with the agreement of the Phase leader and the Principal, but teachers are appraised only on what is in the contract of employment and job description.  In addition, there are documents referred to in the Job Description that implicitly form a part of each member of staff’s contract of employment:  policies and procedures, staff and student handbooks.  Appraisal takes place in the light of these obligations.

teachers are appraised only on what is in the contract of employment and job description.

Phase leaders create their own teams.  There are also cross-phase working groups.  They use the same hierarchical list used in SMT meetings to determine the effectiveness of the staff working in their teams

The Hierarchical List

  • Health and Safety, with a review of incidents
  • Happiness: engagement with learning
    • Are the children happy, safe and supported?
    • Are there gaps in provision?
  • Functioning of community meetings
    • Is the Community functioning well?
    • Do the institutions of self-government work?
  • Use of facilities: physical resources; online resources
    • Do children initiate projects?
    • Do they use activity rooms?
    • Do the online portfolios work?   
  • Attendance
  • Academic results
    • Does the Tracking Mechanism show the level of children’s attainment in core competencies? 
    • Is it acceptable?

All staff are aware of the hierarchy of values.

Expectations

We do not expect staff to immediately understand the school and its philosophy.  We expect to provide induction, training and guidance to new staff.  Staff learn in a similar manner to the children: through activity, dialogue and play/experiment.

  • There is an induction process for new staff.  Staff in the first wave of recruitment will be encouraged to think about how to manage this, since they will be the future leaders of the program
  • New staff are expected to use journals to become reflective good practitioners
  • There are regular discussions after school and using the staff online forum
  • There are regular social events organized by the school where staff can chat in an informal setting
  • Any member of staff can book a private chat with the Principal
  • There are obligatory termly chats with the Phase Leader, which go on to form a part of the SMT termly review
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We want a school where the staff help one another to improve.  We encourage collaboration, Peer Review, the creation of working groups and team teaching.  Phase leaders have overall responsibility for their teams, but encourage their teachers to be creative, dynamic and engaged.  Appraisal in this context is a shared activity.

Principal and Team Leaders

The Principal and Team Leaders need to ensure that the school is working according to its guiding principles.  They can:

  • Observe lessons and activities
  • Examine teachers’ planning and notes
  • Sit in on community meetings
  • Set diagnostic level tests
  • Require that teachers who are experiencing difficulty go for training, are partnered or reassign them within the school

Appraisal is not uniquely linked to student test scores, although the use of the Tracking Mechanism will come into any performance review and online portfolios will be inspected.

When a Phase Leader identifies that a member of the team is not performing up to expectation, the Principal is informed.  The teacher, the Phase Leader and the Principal meet to talk through the difficulty.  These discussions are formal and minuted.  Together they create an Action Plan to improve the deficit in performance, with fixed times on the calendar to review progress.  The Action Plan is attached to the Job Description, referred to in the Termly Chat and brought up in the post term SMT review meeting.

A Clear Vision

MBAT has a clear vision articulated in detailed Job Descriptions.  The management is firm and compassionate.  Staff sign a contract that states clearly the philosophy and practices of the school.  We expect them all to work diligently to fulfil this contract and will offer them every reasonable assistance to do so.  It may be the case that a teacher, for whatever reason, is unable to work within the Job Description or the philosophy of the school.  In this event the Principal will institute the Disciplinary Procedure.  Repeated breaches of the contract will lead to dismissal.

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Learning

You can learn without being in a classroom; you can be in a classroom and not learn

Children go to school to learn. If you have read the posts about the curriculum and teaching, however, you will know that MBAT has a distinctive approach to that learning. We do not suggest that all learning takes place in front of a teacher in a classroom. Play, the Community and Nature are as important as Subject Lessons.

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Play

Not everything that is learnt is taught.  We accept that children learn naturally through play.  There are materials and resources in the classroom and outside that children can use for play.  Sometimes play develops into something approaching a project- for example, dressing up might lead to performing a play.  Teachers are sensitive to the value of free learning.  They may take evidence from free learning to add to online portfolios or to note in the Tracking Mechanism.

Community

Much learning goes on through the community.  Children learn how to resolve disputes peacefully through dialogue.  They learn how to take positions of responsibility in the community, how to propose laws and what to do when laws get broken.  The community organizes festivities at half term and end of term and children are directly involved in the whole process from beginning to end.

Nature

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The focus on Nature and the farm means that children come into direct contact with the soil, living plants and animals.  They learn respect for Nature, which grows over the years as their knowledge and experience deepen.  We do not assess this learning as we think it is important that children do not think that they are “not good at” Nature due to marking.  The experience of Nature is a Core value at MBAT and is a part of our Mission to ensure that children grow up feeling that they can be good custodians of the Natural world.

Subject lessons

The teaching and learning in subject-focused lessons are driven by the standards and objectives in the National Curriculum documents.  We recognize that many of the objectives of the curriculum can be met by free play and activity and through project work.  We do not insist that children sit through subject lessons if they have already mastered a subject.

General Learning Goals

  • Give children direct contact with Nature
  • Focus on children’s learning strengths
  • Offer hands-on learning activities and through observation activities
  • Collaboration through group activities
  • Free play to promote language development, fantasy and problem solving
  • Allow children to make decisions about their own learning
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Dialogue, Community, Compassion, Nature

Teaching

The taught curriculum adheres to the Reduced Formal Curriculum (RFC).  There are documents detailing the curriculum content and the Tracking Mechanism for the Core subjects.  Lessons are clearly structured.  They have a learning objective that comes from the RFC.  Teachers are proficient in expressing the learning objective so that it can be used as a part of the Flipped Classroom model.

Flipping It!

The Flipped Classroom: the teacher records the exposition of the key learning objectives of the class.  This is saved online and can be accessed by learners outside the classroom as many times as they need.  Rather than giving exercises for homework, the exposition is given for homework as preparation for classwork.  Classwork is instead dedicated to clarification of the “lecture”.  This means that class work is dynamic: asking good questions, clearing up doubts, extending learning into new areas.

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Flipping the Classroom is not appropriate with younger learners. However, the Distance Learning Coordinator works with teachers at all levels to ensure that there is sufficient range and depth in the online teaching environment to justify the 40% distance learning component. This is an exciting component of the whole school. It liberates teachers, students and parents from an absolute dependence on the classroom.

Self-directed learning and teaching

Students have considerable freedom to direct their own learning.  They can invent their own projects, engage in activities that they choose, and decide whether to work alone or as part of a group.  Teachers may set up projects for children and become involved with the project work that children have freely initiated.  They are sensitive to children’s interests and adapt the project focus of each teacher-led project according to the response of the group.

Teachers are responsible for acquiring the material, equipment and resources for their classrooms; for organizing learning material and displaying it well.  They may involve children in any part of the organization of the classroom space.

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Children can offer to teach their peers.

Teaching goals

  1. Excellent teaching: clear learning objectives
  2. Use the Flipped Classroom
  3. Use the Online Portfolio
  4. Prize creativity and hands-on experience
  5. Continual professional development both individually and as a team
  6. Compassionate assessment

MBAT employs qualified teachers with at least two years’ experience.  Teachers go through an induction program.